Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea Talks Camp Fire One Year Later

October 23rd, 2019

We caught up with Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea just about one year after the Camp Fire broke out, and about 11 months after we first sat down with him. In this episode, Sheriff Honea talks about how the recovery effort is going, the health and wellness of the community and first responders who endured the response efforts, and what his priorities are now, going forward in the future. He also admits that he and many others underestimated just how long the recovery was going to take, and what it's going to take to rebuild the town of Paradise. 

Be sure to check out our first interview with Sheriff Honea below, just a few weeks into the Camp Fire.

 

Kory L. Honea became the 31st Sheriff of Butte County in May 2014.  Prior to

becoming the Sheriff, Honea served as the Undersheriff for nearly four years.

Sheriff Honea began his career with the Butte County Sheriff's Office in 1993,

when he was hired as a deputy sheriff.  Prior to that Sheriff Honea was employed

by the Shasta County Sheriff's Office.

During his law enforcement career Sheriff Honea has held assignments in

corrections, patrol and investigations.  In 2000, Sheriff Honea transferred

to the District Attorney's Office as an investigator.  While at the District

Attorney's Office, Sheriff Honea promoted through the ranks to become the

Chief Investigator in 2008.  Sheriff Honea held that position until his return to

the Sheriff's Office as Undersheriff in 2010.

Sheriff Honea holds a Juris Doctorate from the Taft School of Law and is a

member of the State Bar of California.  He also holds an Associate of Arts

degree from Butte College.  Sheriff Honea has extensive law

enforcement training certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer

Standards and Training (POST).

Links

Podcast Episode 56: Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea Talks Candidly About the Camp Fire

 

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CERT Members from Around US Gather in San Diego for Notable Preparedness Milestone

June 14th, 2019

SanDiegoPanoStitch.jpg

 

California Volunteers, together with the Office of the Governor, announced on May 30, 2019, they kicked off the California For All CERT and Listos Preparedness Conference during an opening ceremony in San Diego, CA on Thursday, May 30, according to their own description. CalVolunteers officially launched the volunteer teams – CERT (Community Emergency Response Teams) and Listos – who will help engage diverse and socially vulnerable Californians most at risk for wildfires and other natural disasters as part of Governor Gavin Newsom’s California For All Emergency Preparedness Campaign.

 

“We are ushering in a new era of disaster preparedness in California,” said Suu-Va Tai, California Volunteers’ Director of Disaster Volunteering and Preparedness. “Governor Newsom is leveraging the power of tens of thousands of trained volunteers and service members to increase community resiliency throughout California.”

 

This conference marked the first milestone of the California For All Emergency Preparedness Campaign. Grants were awarded to assist California-based CERT and Listos members to attend the multi-day conference occurring May 31-June1, to help launch their involvement as part of the California For All Emergency Preparedness campaign with workshops, trainings and discussion on preparedness and disaster recovery. A press release from April 15, 2019 announced all grants associated with the campaign.  More than 700 participants from the US, Mexico and Chile attended the first national CERT Conference held in San Diego.

 

In this episode we talk with:

KAREN BAKER — CHIEF SERVICE OFFICER, CALIFORNIA VOLUNTEERS, OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

ANDY BURROWS — CITIZEN RESPONDER LEAD, FEMA

Links

California Volunteers

CERT

California For All

 

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Episode 56: Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea Talks Candidly About the Camp Fire

November 28th, 2018

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea

Sheriff Kory L. Honea

In this episode (#56) we sit down with the sheriff of Butte County, California, Kory Honea. His county, of course, was ravaged by the Camp Fire which broke out on November 8, 2018. The Town of Paradise, located within his county, was nearly completely destroyed by the fire that was stoked by 55+mile per hour gusts. Sheriff Honea is facing a death toll that could exceed 100, managing his law enforcement team as well as mutual aid and keeping his citizens safe while they're displaced from homes that were either destroyed or just can't be reached due to the town's closure.  Honea also had the responsibility of evacuating tens of thousands of people to get them out of harms way.  He talks about all that, plus some of the more challenging stresses he's faced and how he's dealing with all of the responsibility that goes along with California's deadliest wildfire disaster.

Kory L. Honea became the 31st Sheriff of Butte County in May, 2014. 
Prior to becoming the Sheriff, Honea served as the Undersheriff for nearly four years. 
Sheriff Honea began his career with the Butte County Sheriff's Office in 1993,  when he was hired as a deputy sheriff.   Prior to that Sheriff Honea was employed  by the Shasta County Sheriff's Office.

During his law enforcement career Sheriff Honea has held assignments in
corrections, patrol and investigations.  In 2000, Sheriff Honea transferred
to the District Attorney's Office as an investigator.  While at the District
Attorney's Office, Sheriff Honea promoted through the ranks to become the Chief Investigator in 2008.  Sheriff Honea held that position until his return to the Sheriff's Office as Undersheriff in 2010.

Sheriff Hone-a holds a Juris Doctorate from the Taft School of Law and is a member of the State Bar of California. 
He also holds an Associate of Arts degree from Butte College. 

 

Links

Butte County Sheriff

Butte County Recovers

Camp Fire Rescued Animals

WildfireRecovery.org

CalOES.ca.gov

OESNews.com

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State Fire Chief Reflects on 40-Year Career as he Prepares to Ride Code-3 into the Sunset

July 3rd, 2018

Kim Zagaris, or Chief Z as some call him, is the State Fire and Rescue Chief for the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES); he was appointed on April 1, 2001. He admits his appointment rattled cages, nerves and even a few careers. He’s not only survived the highly political position, he’s succeeded. In this episode (#48) of All Hazards Chief Z reflects on his storied career, the changes he’s seen at Cal OES and in the business of putting the wet stuff on the red stuff, and what he’s learned.

 

Prior to his appointment, he was the Assistant Fire Chief for Cal OES with assignments in Region I, II, III, IV and V since 1987. He started his career as a Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) seasonal firefighter in 1977 and promoted through the ranks of the local, state and federal fire agencies to the State Fire and Rescue Chief. Chief Zagaris has extensive background in fire service, emergency management, and homeland security which includes working with local, state, federal and international agencies over the last 40 years.

 

As the State Fire and Rescue Chief, Chief Zagaris serves as the Executive Coordinator for Cal OES Fire and Rescue Services Advisory Committee/ FIRESCOPE Board of Directors. The Board provides a State level forum for addressing Statewide Mutual Aid, Incident Command System, Multi-Agency Coordination, Resource Typing, Training, Certification, Safety, Standardization and Fire Protection issues of statewide concern. Chief Zagaris is responsible for managing the FIRESCOPE Program, California Incident Command Certification System, the California Fire Assistance Agreement, State Assistance for Fire Equipment Program, as well as, serve on numerous state and national committees, associations and programs, including Cal OES representation on the California State Strategic Committee on Terrorism, the California Wildfire Coordination Group, the National Fire Protection Association 1500 Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program, he currently chairs the International Fire Chiefs Associations (IAFC) Emergency Management Committee/ National Fire Service Mutual Aid System, the National Fire Service Incident Management System Consortium. He is the past chair of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/ Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Mutual Aid/ Resource Typing Project Team, and a past member of the National Incident Management System ICS Competencies Change Management Board, and the National Wildfire Coordination Group/ Urban Interface Working Team.

The Governor’s Office of Emergency Services owns 114 all-risk Type I Fire Engines, 40 Type III Fire Engines, 12 Water Tenders, 6 Communications/ Support Units, 13 Swift Water Rescue Caches, 12 Type II Hazardous Material Unit and manages California’s 8 Local/State/National Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces in cooperation with those sponsoring agencies. Chief Zagaris is responsible for several major program elements including the day-to-day management of the California Fire and Rescue Mutual Aid System, which includes over 1,100 fire agencies, and some 55,000 professional and volunteer firefighters that operate approximately 6,000 fire engines Statewide.

Links

Oklahoma City Bombing: California Sent its Best to Midwest Terror Response

OESNews.com Podcasts

Cal OES Home Page

FIRESCOPE

 

 

 

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Six Months After the NorCal October 2017 Wildfires

April 10th, 2018

It's been six months since the October 2017 wildfires ravaged Northern Califorina. Through coordination with California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and in close partnership with FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. EPA, Cal EPA and CalRecycle, all major work for the removal of fire and ash debris has now been completed in Butte, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Sonoma and Yuba counties. So far, nearly 1.7 million tons of debris, across all seven counties, have been removed. 

Since the Oct. 10 disaster declaration, nearly 4,500 households have been approved for FEMA individual assistance, for a total of more than $15.7 million. Of this amount, more than $9.6 million has been approved for housing assistance that can assist with home repairs or replacement, rental assistance to be used to find another place to live temporarily while repairs are being made to their home and more than $6.1 million for other needs assistance. Other needs assistance is a grant to pay for other uninsured or underinsured expenses such as disaster-related medical, dental or funeral costs or personal property losses.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is another partner agency that plays an integral role in disaster recovery. The SBA provided assistance to businesses of all sizes, private nonprofits, homeowners and renters in the form of low-interest disaster loans. The SBA has approved nearly 1,200 loans for homeowners, renters and businesses for more than $151 million.

We caught up with Assistant Fire Marshall Paul Lowenthal of the Santa Rosa Fire Department to talk with him about the challenges he and his community faced, what he and his deparment have learned and what changes have come into play in the short six months since the fires broke-out.

Links

WildfireRecovery.org

OESNews.com

Santa Rosa Assistant Fire Marshal Signs Right of Entry Form, Begins His Own Recovery

SonomaCountyRecovers.org

Cal OES Flickr Images

 

 

 

 

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Active Shooter Incidents and Leaving the Patches on the Table

March 13th, 2018

The term active shooter has been in the news a lot lately, unfortunately.  Whether it’s Parkland, Florida, Marshall County, Kentucky, or Yountville, California, armed attacks often leave a trail of dead and injured and shock the communities in which they happen. It’s the kind of tragedy for which law enforcement trains yet can’t always prevent.

In this episode, Cal OES Law Enforcement Chief Mark Pazin, talks about how the agency has increased and improved its active shooter program, the training and some of the more recent challenges state and local law enforcement have faced in order to protect the public from potential attacks. He also expresses his firmly held belief of what it will take to reduce the number of active shooter (or active aggressor, as it’s more often called since not all attackers use firearms) incidents.

Mark Pazin, of Merced, was appointed chief of the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Law Enforcement Branch in December, 2013. Pazin has been sheriff-coroner for Merced County since 2002, where he has served in multiple positions at the Sheriff’s Department since 1981, including area commander and assistant sheriff. Pazin has served on the Alfred E. Alquist Seismic Safety Commission since 2011 and is a past president on the California State Sheriffs’ Association President’s Counsel. He earned a Master of Science degree in national security from the American Military University.

Links

Cal OES Law Branch

Cal OES ACTIVE SHOOTER AWARENESS GUIDANCE

CAL STATE SHERIFF’S ASSOCIATION

CAL CHIEFS

CAL PEACE OFFICERS’ ASSOCIATION

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